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Indian Folk Tales

Just like Suppandi
Just like Suppandi

Suppandi Tales

Jataka Tales - Monkey Stories
Jataka Tales - Monkey Stories

Jataka Tales - Monkey Stories

Jataka Tales - Elephant Stories
Jataka Tales - Elephant Stories

Jataka Tales - Elephant Stories

Kesari - the flying thief
Kesari - the flying thief

Kesari - the flying thief

Jataka Tales - Bird Stories
Jataka Tales - Bird Stories

Jataka Tales - Bird Stories

Kapala Kundala
Kapala Kundala

Kapala Kundala - A Bengali folktale

Jasma of Odes
Jasma of Odes

Jasma of odes

Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 3
Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 3

Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 3

Indian Folk Tales
Indian Folk Tales

Indian Folk Tales

Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 2
Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 2

Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 2

Hothal
Hothal

Hothal

Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 1
Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 1

Jataka Tales- The Rightful King and other stories- Part 1

Great Sanskrit Plays (Udayana)
Great Sanskrit Plays (Udayana)

Great Sanskrit Plays (Udayana)

Jataka Tales - The Giant and the dwarf
Jataka Tales - The Giant and the dwarf

The Giant and the Dwarf

Great Sanskrit Plays (Ratnavali)
Great Sanskrit Plays (Ratnavali)

Great Sanskrit Plays (Ratnavali)

Jataka Tales - The Tales of Misers
Jataka Tales - The Tales of Misers

Tales of Misers

Golden Sand
Golden Sand

Golden Sand

Jataka Tales - The Magic Chant
Jataka Tales - The Magic Chant

The Magic Chant

Gopal the jester
Gopal the jester

Gopal the jester

Jataka Tales - Nandi Vishala
Jataka Tales - Nandi Vishala

Nandhi Vishala

Devi Choudhurani
Devi Choudhurani

Devi Choudhurani - A Bengali Classic

Animal Tales from Arunachal Pradesh
Animal Tales from Arunachal Pradesh

Animal tales from Arunachal pradesh

A Bag of Gold Coins
A Bag of Gold Coins

A bag of gold coins - an Amar Chitra Katha title

Dhola and Maru
Dhola and Maru

The Dhola Maru is a romantic tale of Dhola and Maru in Rajasthan like Romeo-Juliet saga. In Chhattisgarh folk-tale, this story is entirely different than Rajasthan one. The Dhola Maru story is deeply rooted in folklore and oral traditions.[1] The story related work is available in prose and poetry as well as in mixed form also. 'Dhola Maru ri chaupai' a book composed by Kushallabh in 1617, in which he writes that the story is old one. some manuscripts in 1473 also describes about the story. 'Dhola Maru ra doha' is the edited text by Kashi nagari Pracharini sabha.

Cowherd of Alawi
Cowherd of Alawi

Cowherd of Alawi

Chandrapeeda
Chandrapeeda

Chandrapeeda and folk tales from Kashmir

Chandralalat
Chandralalat

Chandralalat - the prince with moon in the forehead

Birbal to the rescue
Birbal to the rescue

Birbal (Hindustani: [birb?l]; born Mahesh Das; 1528–1586) or more accurately Rajah Birbar, was a Hindu advisor in the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar during his rule in India and is mostly remembered in folk tales, which focus mainly on his wit. He belonged to the Brahmin class and was appointed by the emperor as a poet and singer, later formed a close association with him, becoming an important advisor and soon being sent on military expeditions despite having no previous background. In 1586, the emperor sent an army led by Birbal to crush an unrest in the north-west Indian subcontinent, which failed tragically when he was killed along with many troops in an ambush by the rebel tribe. This was one of biggest military setbacks during his reign and Birbal's death is said to have caused much grief to the emperor.

Birbal the inimitable
Birbal the inimitable

Birbal (Hindustani: [birb?l]; born Mahesh Das; 1528–1586) or more accurately Rajah Birbar, was a Hindu advisor in the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar during his rule in India and is mostly remembered in folk tales, which focus mainly on his wit. He belonged to the Brahmin class and was appointed by the emperor as a poet and singer, later formed a close association with him, becoming an important advisor and soon being sent on military expeditions despite having no previous background. In 1586, the emperor sent an army led by Birbal to crush an unrest in the north-west Indian subcontinent, which failed tragically when he was killed along with many troops in an ambush by the rebel tribe. This was one of biggest military setbacks during his reign and Birbal's death is said to have caused much grief to the emperor.

Birbal the witty
Birbal the witty

Birbal (Hindustani: [birb?l]; born Mahesh Das; 1528–1586) or more accurately Rajah Birbar, was a Hindu advisor in the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar during his rule in India and is mostly remembered in folk tales, which focus mainly on his wit. He belonged to the Brahmin class and was appointed by the emperor as a poet and singer, later formed a close association with him, becoming an important advisor and soon being sent on military expeditions despite having no previous background. In 1586, the emperor sent an army led by Birbal to crush an unrest in the north-west Indian subcontinent, which failed tragically when he was killed along with many troops in an ambush by the rebel tribe. This was one of biggest military setbacks during his reign and Birbal's death is said to have caused much grief to the emperor.

Bikal the terrible
Bikal the terrible

Bikal the terrible

Ashwins to the rescue
Ashwins to the rescue

This is the Amar Chitra Katha's title - Ashwins to the rescue

Andher Nagari
Andher Nagari

Andher Nagari and Chaupat Raja

Amarapali
Amarapali

Amrap?li, also known as "Ambap?lika" or "Ambapali", was a nagarvadhu (royal courtesan) of the republic of Vaishali in ancient India around 500 BC.[1] Following the Buddha's teachings she became an arahant. She is mentioned in the old Pali texts and Buddhist traditions, particularly in conjunction with the Buddha staying at her mango grove, Ambapali vana which she later donated to his order, and wherein he preached the famous Ambapalika Sutta.[2][3][4][5]